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Removing concentrate supply in grazing goats: effects on milk production and grazing behaviour

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Abstract

Grazing high-quality pastures and reducing concentrate supply can increase feed and protein self-sufficiency in dairy goat production systems. How dairy goats are able to adapt to the total removing of concentrate supplementation at grazing is unknown. A grazing trial was carried out in spring 2021 to compare 3 concentrate supplementation levels: 0.72, 0.37 and 0.05 kg DM/day. The concentrate was fed individually twice per day at milkings times. A total of 36 lactating Alpine dairy goats (64 DIM and 4.0 kg/d of milk at the beginning of the experiment) were used in a 3×3 Latin square design replicated 12 times over three 3-week consecutive periods from April to June. Daily access time to pasture was of 11 h/d, including 8 h between milkings and 3 h after PM milking, with a daily herbage allowance of 2.6 kg DM/ d at 4 cm above ground level. The three treatments strip-grazed in separated herds, with front fences moved once daily in the morning. At night, goats were inside with no feed provided and ad libitum drinking water available. During the last 5 days of each period, individual milk production, milk composition and grazing behaviour were recorded daily. Behaviour was recorded thanks to the Lifecorder Plus device. Milk production averaged 2.65 kg/d and was reduced linearly with decreasing supplementation level (-67 g of milk /100 g DM of concentrate), as well as milk fat production, milk protein production and milk protein concentration (-27 g/d, -21 g/d and -0,1 g/kg of milk per 100 g DM of concentrate, respectively). Milk fat concentration was reduced on average by 0.5 g/kg of milk per 100 g DM reduction of concentrate supply. Grazing time averaged 453 min/d and increased linearly by 5 min/d per 100 g DM reduction of concentrate supply. As expected, the total suppression of concentrate supply to grazing dairy goats had negative impacts on milk, fat and protein productions, but with effects similar to those observed at greater supplementation levels (e.g. between 400 and 1000 g/d of concentrate). Unsupplemented goats showed good ability to increase their grazing time with fewer but longer meals. Feed-self sufficiency of goat feeding systems may be increased through grazing high-quality pastures with low concentrate supply.
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Dates and versions

hal-03938377 , version 1 (13-01-2023)

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  • HAL Id : hal-03938377 , version 1

Cite

Remy Delagarde, C. Moreau. Removing concentrate supply in grazing goats: effects on milk production and grazing behaviour. 73. Annual meeting of the european federation of animal science (EAAP), EAAP, Sep 2022, Porto, Portugal. pp.388. ⟨hal-03938377⟩

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