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An Agent-Based Model to Explore Game Setting Effects on Attitude Change During a Role Playing Game Session

Résumé : Role playing games (RPGs) can be used as participatory simulation methods for environmental management. However, researchers in the field need to be aware of the influence of the game settings on participants' behavioural patterns and attitudes, before fine tuning the design and use of their games. We developed an agent-based model (CauxAttitude) to assess the framing induced by the conditions of implementation of a specific game, named CauxOpération, on possible changes in participants' attitudes. We designed CauxAttitude on the basis of social psychology theories that describe relations between attitudes and behaviours, as well as on observations of CauxOpération sessions. In this paper, we describe how the model behaved according to variations in the initialization of the parameters, our aim being to explore the effects of subjective choices concerning model design and implementation. The results of our simulations enabled us to identify effects of game settings we explored, including the choice of the population of participants or of the number of participants made by the game designer. Our results also revealed the underlying mechanisms that explain the effects of game settings. These provide clues to the game designer on how to manage them.
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https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-02598274
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Submitted on : Friday, May 15, 2020 - 11:32:15 PM
Last modification on : Friday, October 8, 2021 - 4:26:55 PM

Identifiers

  • HAL Id : hal-02598274, version 1
  • IRSTEA : PUB00037869

Citation

E. Dubois, O. Barreteau, Véronique Souchère. An Agent-Based Model to Explore Game Setting Effects on Attitude Change During a Role Playing Game Session. Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, SimSoc Consortium, 2013, 16 (1), pp.2. ⟨hal-02598274⟩

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