Mosaics, mixtures, rotations or pyramiding: What is the optimal strategy to deploy major gene resistance? - INRAE - Institut national de recherche pour l’agriculture, l’alimentation et l’environnement Access content directly
Journal Articles Evolutionary Applications Year : 2018

Mosaics, mixtures, rotations or pyramiding: What is the optimal strategy to deploy major gene resistance?

Abstract

Once deployed uniformly in the field, genetically controlled plant resistance is often quickly overcome by pathogens, resulting in dramatic losses. Several strategies have been proposed to constrain the evolutionary potential of pathogens and thus increase resistance durability. These strategies can be classified into four categories, depending on whether resistance sources are varied across time (rotations) or combined in space in the same cultivar (pyramiding), in different cultivars within a field (cultivar mixtures) or among fields (mosaics). Despite their potential to differentially affect both pathogen epidemiology and evolution, to date the four categories of deployment strategies have never been directly compared together within a single theoretical or experimental framework, with regard to efficiency (ability to reduce disease impact) and durability (ability to limit pathogen evolution and delay resistance breakdown). Here, we used a spatially explicit stochastic demogenetic model, implemented in the R package landsepi, to assess the epidemiological and evolutionary outcomes of these deployment strategies when two major resistance genes are present. We varied parameters related to pathogen evolutionary potential (mutation probability and associated fitness costs) and landscape organization (mostly the relative proportion of each cultivar in the landscape and levels of spatial or temporal aggregation). Our results, broadly focused on qualitative resistance to rust fungi of cereal crops, show that evolutionary and epidemiological control are not necessarily correlated and that no deployment strategy is universally optimal. Pyramiding two major genes offered the highest durability, but at high mutation probabilities, mosaics, mixtures and rotations can perform better in delaying the establishment of a universally infective superpathogen. All strategies offered the same short‐term epidemiological control, whereas rotations provided the best long‐term option, after all sources of resistance had broken down. This study also highlights the significant impact of landscape organization and pathogen evolutionary ability in considering the optimal design of a deployment strategy.

Dates and versions

hal-02627922 , version 1 (26-05-2020)

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Loup Rimbaud, Julien Papaix, Luke G. Barrett, Jeremy J. Burdon, Peter H. Thrall. Mosaics, mixtures, rotations or pyramiding: What is the optimal strategy to deploy major gene resistance?. Evolutionary Applications, 2018, 11 (10), pp.1791-1810. ⟨10.1111/eva.12681⟩. ⟨hal-02627922⟩
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