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Thermal denaturation of proteins in the muscle fibre and connective tissue from bovine muscles composed of type I (masseter) or type II (cutaneous trunci) fibres: DSC and FTIR microspectroscopy study

Abstract : The changes in secondary structure of proteins with heating were characterised and compared for bovine masseter (fibre type I) and cutaneous trunci (fibre type II) muscles by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) microspectroscopy. Heating led to a decrease in alpha helices, and an increase in aggregated strands, random coils and aromatic side chains in the muscle fibres of both muscles. In the intramuscular connective tissue (IMCT) of both muscles, a decrease in alpha helix, turn and unordered structures was complemented with an increase in aggregated strands. At temperatures < 60 degrees C, the greater thermal denaturation of proteins in cutaneous trunci than in masseter (FTIR), supported by a myosin associated peak at 55.8 degrees C for cutaneous trunci and no peak for masseter (DSC), indicates that myosin in type II fibres is more sensitive to thermal denaturation than myosin in type I fibres and this should be considered in thermal meat processing.
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https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-03294587
Contributor : Sabine Rossi <>
Submitted on : Wednesday, July 21, 2021 - 4:41:33 PM
Last modification on : Wednesday, July 21, 2021 - 4:42:02 PM

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Rozita Vaskoska, Annie Vénien, Minh Ha, Jason White, Ranjith Unnithan, et al.. Thermal denaturation of proteins in the muscle fibre and connective tissue from bovine muscles composed of type I (masseter) or type II (cutaneous trunci) fibres: DSC and FTIR microspectroscopy study. Food Chemistry, Elsevier, 2021, 343, pp.128544. ⟨10.1016/j.foodchem.2020.128544⟩. ⟨hal-03294587⟩

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