Response of soil and vegetation in a warm-temperate Pine forest to intensive biomass harvests, phosphorus fertilisation, and wood ash application - Archive ouverte HAL Access content directly
Journal Articles Science of the Total Environment Year : 2022

Response of soil and vegetation in a warm-temperate Pine forest to intensive biomass harvests, phosphorus fertilisation, and wood ash application

(1) , (1) , (1) , (2) , (1) , (3, 4) , (1) , (1)
1
2
3
4

Abstract

The objective of this study was to assess the effects of different intensities of biomass harvesting, and the possible effects of compensation methods, on forest functioning. To do so, we carried out a split-plot experiment (SW France) crossing four different intensities of biomass harvesting (Stem-Only Harvest [SOH], Aboveground Additional Harvest [AAH], Belowground Additional Harvest [BAH], and Whole-Tree Harvest [WTH]) and three compensation methods (control [C], wood ash application [A] and phosphorus fertilisation [P]). The experimental treatments were followed by the plantation of pines (Pinus pinaster). The environmental consequences of treatments on soil and vegetation were evaluated 11 years after the tree plantation. Despite their low additional biomass exports (+10 % for AAH to +34 % for WTH), the non-conventional harvest practices exported much higher quantities of nutrients than the conventional SOH technique (+145 % of exported N in WTH). Additional biomass harvests impacted the soil organic matter content, with negative effects on P-organic, soil cation exchange capacity, exchangeable Ca, and most extractible nutrients. However, tree nutritional status was improved by P-fertiliser or wood ash. We observed a positive effect of wood ash application on soil pH and nutrient content but, like additional harvests, wood ash application decreased the pool of soil organic carbon (~10 %). Overall, the experiment showed that exporting more forest biomass due to the additional harvesting of biomass had negative consequences on the ecosystem biogeochemistry. Additional harvests have impoverished the soil, and decreased the soil organic carbon content. Importantly, applying nutrients as fertiliser or wood ash did not compensate for all the negative impacts of biomass exports and the method of wood ash recycling in forests could even decrease the soil organic carbon.
Not file

Dates and versions

hal-03763508 , version 1 (29-08-2022)

Identifiers

Cite

Laurent Augusto, Florent Beaumont, Christophe Nguyen, Jean-Yves Fraysse, Pierre Trichet, et al.. Response of soil and vegetation in a warm-temperate Pine forest to intensive biomass harvests, phosphorus fertilisation, and wood ash application. Science of the Total Environment, 2022, 850, pp.157907. ⟨10.1016/j.scitotenv.2022.157907⟩. ⟨hal-03763508⟩
7 View
0 Download

Altmetric

Share

Gmail Facebook Twitter LinkedIn More