Human social conditions predict the risk of exposure to zoonotic parasites in companion animals in East and Southeast Asia - Archive ouverte HAL Access content directly
Journal Articles Communications Medicine Year : 2022

Human social conditions predict the risk of exposure to zoonotic parasites in companion animals in East and Southeast Asia

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Yi-Lun Tsai
Viet-Linh Nguyen
  • Function : Author
Kenneth B Y Tong
  • Function : Author
Yin Zhijuan
  • Function : Author
Jiangwei Wang
  • Function : Author
Junyan Dong
  • Function : Author
Wisnu Nurcahyo
  • Function : Author
Upik K Hadi
  • Function : Author
Virginia Venturina
  • Function : Author
Piyanan Taweethavonsawat
  • Function : Author
Saruda Tiwananthagorn
Thong Q Le
  • Function : Author
Khanh L Bui
  • Function : Author
Malaika Watanabe
  • Function : Author
Puteri a M A Rani
  • Function : Author
Frédéric Beugnet
Lénaïg Halos
  • Function : Author

Abstract

Background A recent dramatic surge in pet ownership has been observed across metropolitan areas in Asia. To date, there is a dearth of information on the risk associated with pet ownership for the transmission of parasites on a large scale in Asia, despite this continent giving rise to the largest burden of zoonotic infections worldwide. Methods We explored the nature and extent of zoonotic internal (endo-) and external (ecto-) parasites and arthropod-borne pathogens in 2381 client-owned dogs and cats living in metropolitan areas of eight countries in East and Southeast Asia using reliable diagnostic tests and then undertook extensive statistical analyses to define predictors of exposure to zoonotic pathogens. Results The estimated ORs for overall parasite infections are 1.35 [95% CIs 1.07;1.71] in young animals and 4.10 [1.50;11.2] in the animal group older than 15 years as compared with adult animals, 0.61 [0.48;0.77] in neutered animals as compared to unneutered animals, 0.36 [0.26;0.50] in animals living in urban areas as compared with rural areas, 1.14 [1.08;1.21] for each 1 °C increase of annual mean temperature which varies from 12.0 to 28.0 °C, and 0.86 [0.78;0.95] for each year of life expectancy which varies from 70.9 to 83.3 years. Conclusions Here we highlight the influence of human life expectancy and the neutering status of the animals, which reflect increased living standards through access to education and human and veterinary health care, to be both strongly associated with exposure to zoonotic parasites. An integrated approach of local and international authorities to implement and manage educational programs will be crucial for the control of zoonotic infections of companion animals in Asia.
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hal-03859692 , version 1 (18-11-2022)

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Attribution - CC BY 4.0

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Vito Colella, Phrutsamon Wongnak, Yi-Lun Tsai, Viet-Linh Nguyen, D Y Tan, et al.. Human social conditions predict the risk of exposure to zoonotic parasites in companion animals in East and Southeast Asia. Communications Medicine, 2022, 2 (1), pp.144. ⟨10.1038/s43856-022-00210-8⟩. ⟨hal-03859692⟩
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