World, European and French trade in oilseeds - Archive ouverte HAL Access content directly
Conference Papers Year :

World, European and French trade in oilseeds

Les échanges mondiaux, européens et français d'oléagineux

(1)
1

Abstract

This paper focuses on the evolution of world, European and French oilseed trade over the last twenty years (since 2000). The statistical information used comes from three complementary databases, namely BACI for international trade, Comext for European Union (EU-27) trade and French Customs for French trade. World trade in oilseeds amount to 161 billion euros in 2020 (excluding intra-EU trade), or nearly 15% of international trade in agri-food products. These are dominated by soya (51% of the total in value), in its various forms (soya beans, soya meal, soya oil), ahead of palm oil (17%), sunflower (8%) and rapeseed (8%). In 2020, the top three oilseed exporters are Brazil (19% of world exports in value), the United States (18%) and Indonesia (11%). While the first two countries export exclusively soya, the third is specialized in palm oil. China has become the world's largest importer of oilseeds (28% of the total in 2020), ahead of the EU-27 (15%), whose deficit for these products (-21.3 billion euros in 2021) is sometimes linked to its large surplus in animal production (47.5 billion euros). France has a deficit in oilseeds (-1.83 billion euros in 2021), mainly due to its purchases of soya meal from the American continent; the latter, which is the subject of controversy because of the deforestation induced in the Amazon, has however decreased by 31% in volume between 2000 and 2021.
Cette communication présente l'évolution, sur une vingtaine d'années (depuis 2000), des échanges mondiaux, européens et français d'oléagineux. Les informations statistiques utilisées sont issues de trois bases de données complémentaires, à savoir BACI pour les échanges internationaux, Comext pour ceux de l'Union européenne (UE-27) et les douanes françaises pour ceux de la France. Les échanges mondiaux d'oléagineux représentent un montant de 161 milliards d'euros en 2020 (hors commerce intra-UE), soit près de 15% du commerce international des produits agroalimentaires. Ceuxci sont dominés par le soja (51% du total en valeur), sous ses différentes formes (graines, tourteaux et huile), devant l'huile de palme (17%), le tournesol (8%) et le colza (8%). En 2020, les trois premiers exportateurs d'oléagineux sont le Brésil (19% des exportations mondiales en valeur), les Etats-Unis (18%) et l'Indonésie (11%). Si les deux premiers pays exportent exclusivement du soja, le troisième est spécialisé en huile de palme. La Chine est devenue le premier importateur mondial d'oléagineux (28% du total en 2020) devant l'UE-27 (15%), dont le déficit pour ces produits (-21,3 milliards d'euros en 2021) est parfois mis en relation avec son fort excédent en productions animales (47,5 milliards d'euros). La France est déficitaire en oléagineux (-1,83 milliard d'euros en 2021), en raison surtout de ses achats de tourteaux de soja sur le continent américain ; ces derniers, qui font l'objet de controverses en raison de la déforestation induite en Amazonie, ont cependant baissé de 31% en volume entre 2000 et 2021.
Fichier principal
Vignette du fichier
CHATELLIER-2022-Les échanges mondiaux européens et français doléagineux (communication JRSS).pdf (910.96 Ko) Télécharger le fichier
Vignette du fichier
CHATELLIER-2022-Les échanges mondiaux européens et français doléagineux (diaporama JRSS).pdf (2.87 Mo) Télécharger le fichier
Vignette du fichier
Programme JRSS-2022.pdf (1.03 Mo) Télécharger le fichier
Origin : Files produced by the author(s)

Dates and versions

hal-03937837 , version 1 (13-01-2023)

Identifiers

  • HAL Id : hal-03937837 , version 1

Cite

Vincent Chatellier. Les échanges mondiaux, européens et français d'oléagineux. 16. Journées de Recherches en Sciences Sociales, SFER; INRAE; CIRAD, Dec 2022, Clermont-Ferrand, France. pp.1-11. ⟨hal-03937837⟩

Collections

INRAE
0 View
0 Download

Share

Gmail Facebook Twitter LinkedIn More