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Atomic force microscopy of food assembly: Structural and mechanical insights at the nanoscale and potential opportunities from other fields

Abstract : The atomic force microscope (AFM) has opened access to the nanoscale observation of molecular and colloidal structures in aqueous media, and of their dynamics upon environmental changes. As a miniature force scanner, it furthermore allows the correlative mapping of mechanical properties at the nanoscale or precise indentation of individual structures. Soon after its invention in 1986, the AFM rapidly found increasing applications in soft matter physics, cellular biology, polymer science and microbiology. In spite of significant successes as early as the 90s, the growth of AFM application in the field of food science has been comparatively slower. This review points to the realizations and opportunities of AFM in showing the connections between the structural and mechanical properties of food's building blocks and of their assemblies. Possible transfers from other disciplines to food science are presented as suggestions for future applications.
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Submitted on : Monday, May 25, 2020 - 12:35:43 PM
Last modification on : Monday, August 16, 2021 - 5:18:03 PM

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Sameh Obeid, Fanny Guyomarc'H. Atomic force microscopy of food assembly: Structural and mechanical insights at the nanoscale and potential opportunities from other fields. Food Bioscience, Elsevier, 2020, 36, pp.100654. ⟨10.1016/j.fbio.2020.100654⟩. ⟨hal-02617534⟩

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